When We Were Young podcast

69: “Shining, Shimmering, Splendid” – Disney’s Renaissance Era 1989-1994

Look at these films, aren’t they neat? Any Disney fan’s movie collection’s complete if it includes THE LITTLE MERMAID (1989), BEAUTY & THE BEAST (1991), ALADDIN (1992) and THE LION KING (1994). These movies aren’t just the four most popular films from Disney’s Renaissance period (which lasted a full decade and includes 10 animated flicks); they’re also responsible for saving the animation department at the Mouse House and making an unprecedented mark on animation, Broadway and pop culture in general.

Instead of watching Disney’s “live action” remakes of these classics, we took a magic carpet ride back to the late 80s and early 90s to revisit the films themselves. Are Ariel, Belle and Jasmine modern feminist icons, or are they still stuck in traditional gender roles? Does The Lion King still rule our hearts? And who’s the hottest prince of them all? Hurry and listen to our latest episode before the last rose petal falls and we all turn into furniture forever!

When We Were Young is a podcast devoted to the most beloved pop culture of our formative years (roughly 1980-2000). Join us for a look back to the past with a critical eye on how these movies, songs, TV shows and more hold up now. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email your episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on iTunes so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which includes purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California, by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

68: “Suck Me, Beautiful” – American Pie

Feeling patriotic this July? Well, if there’s one thing more American than apple pie, it’s a questionable attitude toward sex — and that’s exactly what we’re serving up in our latest episode!

To commemorate the 20th anniversary of AMERICAN PIE, When We Were Young looks back at the wave of 80s teen sex comedies that inspired it, from the problematic peep-show that is Porky’s to lewd, lowbrow early roles from Johnny Depp, Tom Cruise, and John Cusack. It’s no secret that these films peddled T&A to get butts in seats back then, but how titillating does all that groping, leering, and objectification of females look from a modern vantage point?

Then, it’s time to ogle American Pie all over again. The rude and raunchy sleeper hit comedy helped launch the careers of Jason Biggs, Tara Reid, Chris Klein, Mena Suvari, Seann William Scott, and Natasha Lyonne amongst others, with memorable turns from comedy legends Eugene Levy and Jennifer Coolidge, too. But how does a story about four horny teen boys making a pact to lose their virginity by prom night hold up in 2019? Is American Pie still a solid laugh-and-cringe fest, or have changing sexual mores over the last two decades made its comedic prowess go limp? No flute, baked good, or suspiciously murky beer escapes scrutiny in our latest episode!

When We Were Young is a podcast devoted to the most beloved pop culture of our formative years (roughly 1980-2000). Join us for a look back to the past with a critical eye on how these movies, songs, TV shows and more hold up now. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email your episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on iTunes so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which includes purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California, by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

67: “Hi, I’m Chucky, Wanna Play?” – Child’s Play

Some movie characters become way bigger than the movies they’re in, and that definitely holds true for Chucky. The redheaded murder-loving doll is no doubt one of horror’s most recognizable villains, but how often do you hear people fondly talk about the films he stars in? (There are seven and counting!) Inspired by a fresh reboot releasing this month in theaters – the first Chucky film without creator Don Mancini – we take a look back at CHILD’S PLAY (1988) to see if Chucky’s introduction to the world is deserving of any modern day recognition from horror fans.

We follow that with a viewing of CHILD’S PLAY 2 (1990) and BRIDE OF CHUCKY (1998), two sequels that could not be more different from one another despite being made by the same person. We also reveal our favorite childhood playthings, discuss Chucky’s, um, problematic behavior towards women, and debate just how young is too young to enjoy schlock horror movies. Wanna play?

When We Were Young is a podcast devoted to the most beloved pop culture of our formative years (roughly 1980-2000). Join us for a look back to the past with a critical eye on how these movies, songs, TV shows and more hold up now. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email your episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on iTunes so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which includes purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California, by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

66: “This Town Needs An Enema!” – Tim Burton’s Batman

Every generation gets the BATMAN it deserves, and ours is hands-down the best to ever glower down at us from the big screen — Michael Keaton’s scowling, brooding Caped Crusader, and his equally brooding (but also very neurotic) take on orphaned playboy Bruce Wayne.

Early in his career, Tim Burton controversially cast everyman Keaton as the superhero who redefined the modern blockbuster as more than just a movie — with a pop soundtrack by Prince, fast food tie-ins, and an iconic logo everyone was wearing back in 1989. (And ever since.) Jack Nicholson’s unforgettably over-the-top Joker also raised the bar for movie villains (and movie star paydays) in one of the decade’s very biggest films.

The mass-marketing returned in 1992’s BATMAN RETURNS, which upped the ante with two larger-than-life adversaries — the oozy, outrageous Penguin, played with gruesome gusto by Danny DeVito, and Michelle Pfeiffer’s seductive but deeply damaged Catwoman.

The podcast invites When We Were Young superfan Jan to reminisce on all the Batman merch, cosplay, and fan fiction of our youths, before revisiting Burton’s Batman films with a critical eye. Does the macabre camp of 1989’s Batman hold up against the more somber Batmen of recent years? Is its chilly, gleefully anarchic, and disturbingly erotic sequel decidedly not okay for kids? And, in a movie landscape that’s now littered with superheroes, do these Batman films look quaint alongside Marvel’s colossal conquest of the multiplex — or is Tim Burton’s singular vision just so much yummier?

Strap on your utility belt, fire up the Bat-vehicle of your choice, and have your butler ready a dirty limerick to excuse your absence, because Gotham City’s most wanted are wreaking havoc upon our podcast — and only your nostalgia can stop them!

When We Were Young is a podcast devoted to the most beloved pop culture of our formative years (roughly 1980-2000). Join us for a look back to the past with a critical eye on how these movies, songs, TV shows and more hold up now. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email your episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on iTunes so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which includes purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California, by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

65: “The Whim of a Madman” – Speed

Cinematographer-turned-director Jan De Bont never met a mode of transportation he didn’t want to blow up, and it all started with SPEED (1994), the action-thriller that whittled Keanu Reeves into the wooden king of turn-your-brain-off blockbusters (see also: the Matrix and John Wick franchises). This high-concept hit has one of the most iconic movie plots of all time, with madman Dennis Hopper planting a bomb on a city bus that will go boom if the odometer falls under 50 MPH. Fortunately, a very plucky Sandra Bullock is on hand to help careen through Los Angeles’ notorious rush hour traffic and quip some snappy one-liners in her star-making role.

And if all those elevators, buses, and subway cars make you claustrophobic, you’re in luck! We’ve also booked a honeymoon suite aboard SPEED 2: CRUISE CONTROL (1997), De Bont’s Caribbean-set sequel that finds Sandra Bullock and Almost Keanu taken hostage on a cruise ship by yet another disgruntled psycho. (After a half-dozen mai tais, you’ll swear it’s Titanic!)

So join us as your favorite hotshots take a pop quiz that asks just one question — is Speed still worth the ride, or should we hit the brakes?

When We Were Young is a podcast devoted to the most beloved pop culture of our formative years (roughly 1980-2000). Join us for a look back to the past with a critical eye on how these movies, songs, TV shows and more hold up now. Follow us on Twitter and Instagram at @WWWYshow, on Facebook at Facebook.com/WWWYShow and email your episode suggestions to wwwyshow@gmail.com. Don’t forget to subscribe and review us on iTunes so more folks check out the show!

Help us defray the costs of creating this show, which includes purchasing movies/shows/music to review, delivery food to eat our feelings, and producing & editing in-house at the MFP Studio in Los Angeles, California, by donating to our Patreon account at patreon.com/WhenWeWereYoung

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